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Meetings and excursions 2023

Meetings and excursions 2023 archive


 

Annual General Meeting Thursday 2nd March 2023, 7.30 PM

The AGM will be held in the UTAS Law Building, Sandy Bay. Access instructions are here https://tasfieldnats.org.au/data/documents/Field-Nats-venueFeb-2022.pdf .

Eddie Gall will present this year’s President’s address, Forty Winters in Tasmania’s Mountains, a visual celebration of snow-capped mountains and frosted valleys from throughout the island’s wild areas.

You are invited to nominate for any position on the committee. The nomination form is here. In particular, the club will need a new secretary and your nomination for that position would be greatly appreciated.

Only financial members will be able to vote at the AGM so please pay your annual subscription prior to the meeting.


 Excursion to Big Bend Trail - Saturday 4th March - 10:00 AM

The Big Bend Trail on Mt Wellington has been improved making it a much easier track to walk on. We will meet at the Pinnacle Road Car Park about 500m past the Big Bend Trail. This is about 2km past the Chalet. From the car park we will walk back down the road to the Big Bend Trail. The track features subalpine heaths and snow gum forest and in early March should have good insect life. Those fleet-of-foot might like to climb Tom Thumb or make a circuit by returning via the Devils Throne Track and Thark Ridge Track.


 

Return to Vale of Belvoir Excursion

Regatta Day Long Weekend, Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th February 2023

Where to meet
On Saturday, we will be going to the Corbett’s property near the Vale of Belvoir. About 1.5 km west along Belvoir Road (also called the Cradle Mountain Link Road) from Cradle Mountain turnoff (Learys Corner), there is a white gravel road going off to right. This is about 10 minutes’ drive from Cradle Campground.  Our first meeting point will be 200m along the gravel road at a large yellow Hydro gate. See here for a map of the location that includes a photo of the turn off.

Cradle Valley/Vale of Belvoir is about four and a half hour’s drive from Hobart.


The Corbett’s Property
The property has a range of vegetation types from rainforest through several eucalypt woodland types to various sedgelands to open grassland and daisy meadows. The vegetation map shows the distribution of these various communities. To help find our way around, Keith has supplied a map of roads, walking tracks and names of his block’s locations. There is a toilet in the Home Paddock. Shade and water will be available. Water from the Fall River is safe to drink. For more information about the Vale of Belvoir, please look at Keith’s 2012 article in The
Tasmanian Naturalist https://www.tasfieldnats.org.au/naturalist/ . There was a Bioblitz in the main part of the Vale and plant list from it is available here.

Here is a map of contours.


Saturday’s program

Keith and son John will take us through the yellow Hydro gate at 10:00 AM. The road to the property is a good quality 4WD track so some rationalisation of vehicles may be necessary. We will start with a familiarisation walk around the block which should take about an hour and a half. After that, we will be able to break up into smaller groups to enjoy the block or survey areas of particular interest. Sunday’s program This will be decided upon on the Saturday. It is likely we will visit the nearby Lake Lea at the north end of the Vale, where there is good swimming and walking around the lake shore.

Accommodation

Being a tourist area at the peak of tourist season, most nearby accommodation has been booked out. At the time of writing, some expensive accommodation options were available nearby. Hotels and motels in Sheffield, Burnie, Ulverstone, Penguin and Devonport may have available rooms. Free camping is available on the Corbett Block, in the First Paddock, provided people are self-contained. Contact Keith on 0419 593 059 if you’re interested.
Irene MacFarlane has kindly offered members camping at her Ecoshack. It is located a few kilometres east of Waratah, about 30 or 40 minutes’ drive from the Vale of Belvoir. Waratah has a roadhouse, petrol station, café and hotel. There is plenty of flat land. You will need to supply your own water and porta-potties and share kitchen facilities. There is plenty of room for a campfire, but at this time of year there may be a fire ban. There are no
barbeques available, so you are welcome to bring your own. It would be preferable for campers to be fully self-contained. Campers can arrive on Friday and stay as long as they like.

If you are interested, please contact Irene by email irenemacfarlane123@gmail.com .

Food, Fuel, and Pharmacy
You’ll have to look after yourself as far as all meals are concerned. Bring your own lunches
and refreshments for both days in the Vale. Fuel, groceries, and counter meals/restaurants
are available at Sheffield, Cradle Mountain, and Waratah.
The nearest pharmacy is Turnbull’s Pharmacy at 57 Main Street, Sheffield.

Updated 26 January 2023

 


 

Informal Excursion for the Miena Jewel Beetle

Sunday 5th February 2023, meet in Bothwell at10:15 AM

The current intention is to meet at 10:15 AM at Sealy’s Store Café, corner of Alexander St and Dalrymple St, Bothwell. This is 1 hour and 15 minutes from Hobart. After a cuppa, we will drive to Liawenee, about a further hour’s drive, to search for the Miena Jewel Beetle, Castiarina insculpta. In the afternoon, we may also look in the Lake Augusta area. Emergence of the beetle is dependent on the coincidence of the flowering of the Ozothamnus hookeri and warm temperatures. Consequently, please check this website close to the 5th February for any last minute changes. An announcement will also be made at the February General Meeting.


 

 General Meeting - Thursday 2nd. February - 7.30pm

Dr Magali Wright will present: 'Orchid conservation in Tasmania'.

Dr Magali Wright is the leader of the Orchid Conservation Program of the Landscape Recovery Foundation. Many of Tasmania's threatened plants are orchids and with their obligate mycorrhizal relationship with fungi, are some of the most challenging species to propagate.